Top Tsukemen in Ginza: Oborozuki

For tsukemen in Ginza, the only place you need to visit is Ginza Oborozuki (銀座朧月). This 7-seater hole-in-the-wall also serves top-notch ramen.

Top Tsukemen in Ginza - Oborozuki

Oborozuki - Tsukemen from Heaven

Oborozuki means “hazy moon” – an apt description for the thick and murky broth. It’s pork bones, chicken feet, mackerel, bonito fish and other ingredients.


Modern fish / pork tsukemen (dipping ramen) broth is intense – a combination of sour, sweet, salty, and umami. Obrozuki’s tsukemen broth forges harmony between these 4 flavors.

Oborozuki Tsukemen in Ginza
Picture Perfect Tsukemen

The broth beautifully and constructively clings to the ultra thick noodles (choose 200 or 300 grams). Of all toppings, the smoky broiled pork chashu are most celestial. The egg though is no joke and the kaiware sprouts are a nice detail.

Top Tsukemen in Ginza - Oborozuki Noodles

“Soup wari” (hot water to top off your broth) at the end is possible – simply hand your bowl over.


Ramen to Write Home About

Their “Chukasoba” (ramen) goes in a different direction. It’s a light shoyu (a shoyu from Wakayama) broth that likely utilizes a lot of veggies and has a hint of niboshi fish.

Top Tsukemen in Ginza - Oborozuki Ramen
Chukasoba

Just like with the tsukemen, you know they’re using quality pork. While not broiled, the thinner slices of seasoned pork compliment the milder broth.


Komatsuna and a sea of chopped negi give the broth a punch of sweetness and a crunchy texture. A quail egg hides amidst the medium-thick and wavy noodles.

Top Tsukemen in Ginza - Oborozuki Inside

I love entering Oborozuki. It’s like a tiny cave – with the aromas having nowhere to go but into your nose. For tsukemen in Ginza (or even ramen), Oborozuki does everything right. They've bagged multiple awards over the years too.

Top Tsukemen in Ginza - Oborozuki Outside

Click here for Tokyo’s TOP 10 Tsukemen Restaurants.